Sign-up to receive Kathy's FREE E-Newsletter or Weekly Blog Posts

Archive | Holiness

5 Benefits of Living a Holy Life

Would you like to sit next to God and snuggle up against His side? To be so close you could hear Him breathe? There would be no distance between the two of you, no barriers to prevent you from drawing near. You could linger in His presence and rest in the circle of His embrace.

All of us desire to experience this kind of intimate relationship with our heavenly Father. Yet, we often feel disconnected. We may even sense that something blocks our path to deep, personal companionship with God.

holinessAccording to Scripture, a life of holiness can pave the way for greater intimacy in our relationship with God. King David, described as a “man after God’s own heart” (Acts 13:22), understood the connection between a holy life and experiencing God’s presence.

Who may worship in your sanctuary, LORD? Who may enter your presence on your holy hill? Those who lead blameless lives and do what is right, speaking the truth from sincere hearts.  Psalm 15:1-2, NLT

Unholy living floods believers’ lives with the natural consequences of sin, including distance and strain in our relationships with God. But a pursuit of holiness is also a pursuit of God. As we embrace the holy life God calls us to, we are embraced by the Holy One Himself.

“Holiness” is often misunderstood. Many believers think living a holy life is just too hard. Or too boring. Or simply undesirable. They recognize the truth that God commands His children to be holy and want to please Him, but life gets in the way. Others compare themselves to the Christians around them and think they’re doing pretty good. But, God doesn’t call us to “pretty good.” His holiness is our standard (1 Peter 1:16).

Jesus died so we could be holy. If we belong to Jesus, we are a “new creation,” a “new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:23-24). Holiness is for our good and God’s glory!

Sound like an overwhelming, daunting, impossible task? Humanly speaking it is. But, whatever God requires of His children, He also supplies. God requires holiness, but His Spirit provides the power to turn away from sin. God calls us to holiness and God provides what we need to be holy.

 

5 Benefits of Holiness

1. Holiness fosters intimacy with God and builds spiritual strength and stability (Psalm 15:1-6)

2. Holiness makes us useful and effective for God’s purposes (2 Timothy 2:20-26)

3. Holiness in your life causes people around you to glorify God (1 Peter 2:9-12)

4. Holiness builds peace with God (2 Peter 3:10-18)

5. Holiness pleases God and produces “fruit”(Ephesians 5:1-17)

And those 5 benefits are just the beginning of how God blesses a holy life!

God calls us to holiness so we can be set free from the bondage and consequences of our own sin. God also knows that a holy life paves the way for deep intimacy with Him (Psalm 15:1-2). Holiness sets us free and draws us close to God!

Holiness in God’s people also brings Him glory. When we live holy lives we reflect God’s character to the world. We become lights in a dark world that lead the way to the Savior.

Holiness. For our good. For God’s glory.

How have you thought about holiness in the past? Have you thought a holy life was too hard? Simply undesirable? Would love to hear your thoughts!

 

Read More »

10 Characteristics of a Blameless Life

Imagine entering heaven and approaching God’s throne. Picture yourself as you kneel at His feet and bask in the joy of His presence. All the struggles of life fade away as you praise Him who sits on the throne.

blamelessDo you long to enter God’s holy presence and joyfully worship at His feet? According to Psalm 15:2, those whose “walk is blameless” may dwell in God’s sanctuary and live on His holy hill. I long to enter God’s presence, but I’m not sure I would describe myself as “blameless.” Would you?

What does it mean to be blameless?

According to Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words, the Hebrew word translated as “blameless” in Psalm 15:2 describes a person with “nothing in his outward activities or internal disposition that is odious to God.”

Good definition, but that’s too general for me to get my mind around. I need some specifics about what a “blameless” life looks like. Thankfully, the Bible tells us. Psalm 15 and 102 describe a blameless life (Read them now if you have time. They are not long.) The following list of characteristics is derived from these two psalms of David.

10 Characteristics of a Blameless Person

  1. She practices praise – Regularly contemplate the holy nature of God. Recognizing His worthiness will not only foster praise, we will also be moved to obedience.
  2. She lives with integrity at home – Sometimes we fail to purposefully watch our words and actions at home like we do other places. We tend to let our guard down; to allow our first, sinful instincts to rule. We need to be as careful at home as we are away from home.
  3. She turns away from everything vile or vulgar – “Blameless” woman do not compromise with the sinful ways of the world. We don’t allow ourselves to become desensitized to immorality, crudeness, or risqué humor by watching it, reading it, or listening to it. For a sad example, read this post “Holiness is not a Shade of Grey.”
  4. She ruthlessly guards against evil thoughts and behavior – We must proactively rid our lives of every thought and action contrary to the nature and character of God.
  5. She does not use her words to tear down others – Our speech should be edifying and encouraging. That doesn’t mean everything we need to say will be easy. But it does mean it will be helpful to the hearer.
  6. She does not collaborate with ungodly, wicked people – The only way to never encounter ungodly people is to leave this life and transfer to heaven. However, we can choose not to enter into agreements, projects, or business dealings with people whose worldview is not Christ-centered.
  7. She embraces honesty – Satan is the father of lies. Anytime we are less than honest we have yielded to the tempter! Let’s commit to total honesty in our own lives and conduct. We should also expect honesty from the people around us and distance ourselves from those who refuse to be honest.
  8. She does not seek gain that brings harm to others – God wants us to use our God-given skills, talents, and gifts to support the Kingdom, serve others, and provide for ourselves and our families. However, any effort for gain or advancement that takes advantage of others is sinful.
  9. She squashes pride and conceit – Pride fosters an abundance of sin. Those who want to live blameless before God will seek humility by keeping both God and ourselves in proper perspective.
  10. She helps, encourages, and protects the godly – God calls us to serve others and meet the needs of those who cannot help themselves. Do we respond when they cross our paths?

This may not be a complete list of “blameless” characteristics, but it’s a start. Let’s keep searching God’s Word, applying what He shows us, and enjoying His holy presence!

Which of these 10 characteristics do you struggle with the most? Why is that, do you think?

Read More »

I am Clueless

Have you ever been wronged by someone who had no idea she had done anything? It may have been hurtful words or inconsiderate actions. But she was completely clueless. It’s happened to me. And I know without a doubt that I’ve done it to others as well.

I read a Psalm recently during my quiet time that I’ve read dozens of times. However, this time God showed me something I had not really noticed before.

Who can discern his errors? Forgive my hidden faults. Keep your servant also from willful sins; may they not rule over me. Then will I be blameless, innocent of great transgression. Ps 19:12-13

At first read, it’s easy to understand “hidden faults” as those things we do we don’t want others to know about. The things we do in the dark, hide from others. But the surrounding statements shed a bit of light. David realized that he was not capable of even recognizing all the ways he sinned against our high and lofty God.

Let’s read it again from the New Living Translation:

How can I know all the sins lurking in my heart? Cleanse me from these hidden faults. Keep me from deliberate sins! Don’t let them control me. Then I will be free of guilt and innocent of great sin. Psalm 19:12-13, NLT

Sometimes I sin against God and don’t even realize it. My sinful heart keeps me from being able to recognize the depth of my transgression against our holy God. I’m clueless. My sin nature blinds me to my own sin.

The psalmist, David, asked God to forgive him for the sin he was not even aware he had committed. Then he asked God to protect him from yielding to blatant temptation. David longed to be blameless – innocent in thought, attitude, and deed. And not in just the things that people would notice. David wanted to be innocent in the eyes of his holy God. Wow!

God has brought me back to these verses several times in the last week. Do you think He’s trying to tell me something? Every time, my prayer has been David’s prayer:

May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O LORD, my Rock and my Redeemer. Ps 19:14 

Are you brave enough to ask God to reveal your hidden faults?

Read More »

Healthy Church or Unhealthy Church? 7 Signs to Check

healthy churchWe’ve changed churches eight times in 34 years of marriage. No, we aren’t “church hoppers,” we’ve simply moved a lot with my husband’s job. In fact, my husband and I are currently visiting churches after our recent move to a new city. With all that “church searching,” we’ve learned to spot a healthy church and we’ve learned some marks of an unhealthy church.

After each church visit, Wayne and I talk about the experience. What did we see and hear? What sense did we get of the church body and its leadership? What did we learn about the church that helps us understand its priorities? What did we witness that was either positive or threw up some red flags?

Although not an exhaustive list, the following seven areas will help you diagnose the health of your church or one you are visiting.

7 signs to help you know if your church is healthy or unhealthy

  1. Quality of the Fellowship – God designed the church to do life together, not just gather for a brief time on Sunday mornings (Acts 2:42-47). Do the members  engage with one another before and after the service? Do they connect at other times during the week? Another important question – is their fellowship inclusive or exclusive? A healthy church will reach out to visitors with genuine interest and attempt to include them.
  2. Centrality of the Gospel– The death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus should be of “first importance” (1 Corinthians 15:3-11). Topical messages and sermon series are helpful and needed, but we should never neglect the Gospel. Whether a formal presentation or sprinkled throughout the Sunday message, the Gospel should always be in mind. How often do you hear it at your church? When was the last time someone responded to the Gospel invitation with a profession of faith in Christ?
  3. Involvement in missions – Jesus commissioned His church to take the Gospel to the world (Matthew 28:16-20). How involved is your church in sharing the Gospel and serving others in the name of Jesus, both locally and around the world?
  4. Attitude and atmosphere – transparency, share struggles and victories as fellow faith travelers, worship, prayer
  5. Commitment to spiritual growth – Commitment should start at the top. The church’s leaders should be personally committed to spiritual growth and maturity and they should purposefully work to guide the church to grow. Things like corporate prayer, Bible study, mentoring, and discipleship indicate a strong commitment (Ephesians 4:11-16).
  6. Accountability for its members – This is an area of weakness for any the healthiest of churches. Our culture has conditioned us not to mess in other people’s business. But that’s not how God designed the church. God calls us to holiness and calls us to encourage others to holiness. (1 Corinthians 5: 1-12, 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8, Hebrews 3:12-13, James 5:16).
  7. Passion for Jesus – The church not only belongs to Jesus, it’s all about Him. A church can work hard, preach the Word, and impact the community, but if Jesus isn’t her “first love,” her heart is not in the right place (Revelation 2:1-5).

What About Your Church?

Numbers, prestige, and celebrity pastors don’t mean much. I’ve seen huge mega-churches that weren’t spiritually healthy. I’ve visited small, country churches that shone with spiritual vitality.
As our church search continues, we are aware God may direct us to either a healthy church or one that needs some spiritual healing. That’s His choice. We will do our best to serve Him and the church where He calls us.
Are there any marks of a healthy church you would add to this list? If so, feel free to share them with a Scripture reference! 
Other posts in this series on the church:
Read More »

3 Ways to Encourage Others

encourageEarlier this week I got to teach at my church’s ladies’ summer Bible study. It was a bit bittersweet because it was the last time before we move next week. And ironically, the summer Bible study topic is friendship. I admit, a few times I had to hold back tears.

I taught on the friendship of Barnabas and Paul, specifically the way Barnabas encouraged Paul. What I learned from studying their relationship was enlightening and I thought you might get something from it too!

“Barnabas,” which means “son of encouragement,” was a nickname given to Joseph the Levite by the apostles (Acts 4:36-37). You can guess how Barnabas earned this endearing moniker. He was well-known for encouraging others.

Barnabas and Paul’s relationship began with Saul the Persecutor returned to Jerusalem for the first time after his saving encounter with Jesus. He tried to join the believers, but they fearfully rejected him. “But Barnabas…” (Acts 9:27).

3 Ways Barnabas Encouraged Paul

  1. Barnabas Extended Friendship (Acts 9:26-30) – Barnabas did not act foolishly. He listened to Paul’s story and then with spiritual wisdom and discernment he became an advocate for Paul with the Jerusalem church. Barnabas opened the door for Paul into the fellowship of believers.
  2. Barnabas Fostered Paul’s Gifts (Acts 11:22-26) – When the new, thriving church in Antioch needed leadership, Barnabas brought Paul to work alongside him. Barnabas knew the church needed Paul’s gifts and that Paul needed to grow and develop his leadership skills. Barnabas acted as “matchmaker!”
  3. Barnabas helped Paul reach his spiritual potential (Acts 13:1-13) – In the middle of their first missionary journey together, Barnabas recognized God’s call on Paul’s life. Without any signs of jealousy, he humbly stepped back and let Paul take the lead.

3 Ways We can Encourage Others Like Barnabas

After studying Paul and Barnabas’ friendship, I cast a wider net to see what the rest of the New Testament teaches us about encouraging one another. Both the noun and verb forms of the basic Greek word mean “to call to one’s side; to comfort, exhort, encourage, and console.” After reading numerous examples, I condensed them to these 3 specific ways we can encourage other believers.

  1. Comfort the suffering and hurting (2 Corinthians 1:3-4) – When tragedy hits, when troubles rage, our friends need more than our prayers. They also need our presence. They need us to come to their side. To cry with them. To serve and help in practical ways. And they need to share about times God has helped us in similar circumstances.
  2. Strengthen the weary (1 Thessalonians 3:1-3) – Sometimes believers just get tired. There isn’t necessarily any one specific trial, we are just bone tired. Or discouraged by life in general. We need some refreshment. We can encourage each other by helping with the load. By sharing a laugh. By bringing ice cream!
  3. Exhort the spiritually lazy or those tangled in sin (1 Thessalonians 2:10-12) – This is the form of encouragement we lack the most today. We don’t want to “meddle” in others’ lives. We don’t want to “judge.” But all that is merely an excuse to ignore our biblical responsibility to each other. Scripture commands us to call other believers out of sin. To push them toward holiness. And in doing so, we may save them much heartache.

Who needs your encouragement today? Is there someone you know right now that needs an advocate? How can you build a bridge for them into your local fellowship? Is their a weary friend who needs refreshment? What tangible thing can you do today to encourage them? Is there a friend caught in a harmful cycle of sin? How can you bravely intervene? 

Read More »

Grace or Truth? Yes

Grace or truthIn the wake of the Orlando terrorist attack, an ongoing debate in the Christian community has once again taken center stage. Should Christians extend abundant grace to all or should we stand firm on the truth of God’s Word?

What is the answer? Grace or truth? The answer is a resounding “yes!”

It’s not grace or truth. It’s grace and truth. As Christians, we cannot leave either by the wayside. Jesus, “who came from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14), is our example.

Yes, the suffering world desperately needs the love and grace of Jesus. But it’s sin that has caused the suffering in the world. Our culture is saturated with its devastating consequences.

Grace Covers Every Sin

Sin is a cancer eating away at the fabric of our society. We see its effects everywhere. Our prisons overflow. The family is disintegrating. Sex fuels the popular culture. This cancer needs a cure before it’s too late for the patient. We need God’s grace and His truth.

A few years ago when this same issue heated up over a controversial interview with Phil Robertson of Duck Dynasty fame, one well-known Christian author wrote that she chooses to “preach the scandalous love of Jesus in the face of any issue, demographic, or debate.” Yet, how can we share the love of Christ without sharing His greatest act of love.

“But God demonstrated His own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us” (Romans 5:8). The Gospel isn’t the Gospel without the “Jesus died for our sins” part (1 Corinthians 15:3).

Jesus died for our sins. Without the acknowledgment of sin, there will be no recognition of a need for a Savior. And there will be no salvation. No spiritual healing.

The world needs both grace and truth, but they also won’t respond to a dogmatic diatribe of right and wrong. While we must not hesitate to share God’s truth, our conversation must always be “full of grace” (Colossians 4:6), presented with “gentleness and respect” (1 Peter 3:15). (For more on how Christians can interact with a lost world read “Should Christians be the Morality Police?”)

Of course, there will be times – no matter how graciously we present God’s truth – that the hearers will respond with anger and hate. The message of the Cross is foolishness to the world (1 Corinthians 1:18). For some, it is a sweet aroma of life, but to others it is the smell of death (2 Corinthians 2:14-16). But that should not keep us from sharing the Good News. And we should not water it down to make it more palatable.

The Gospel is good news because Jesus will receive any and every sinner! There is no sin too great, no background too sordid, no heart too rebellious. Jesus’ sacrificial death covers it all. The cross is able to heal all wounds.

Jesus Calls Believers to Holiness

Yet on the redeemed side of the cross, He calls us to live holy lives. Just as He lifted the woman caught in adultery and said, “Go and sin no more,” He raises us up in new lives and tells us to “live a life worthy of the calling we have received” (Ephesians 4:1). Sadly many today who proclaim Christ embrace a form of “Christianity” that looks more like our culture than like Christ. (Read more about cultural Christianity in this excellent article by Stephanie Shott.)

Yes, Jesus invites us to come to Him just as we are. But, He doesn’t want us to stay just as we are.

God calls the prideful to humility.

God calls the selfish to give.

God calls the gossip to speak only word that build up and encourage.

And calls the sexually immoral to purity.

In other words, God calls believers to holiness (Ephesians 4:24). We cannot sweep continued, unrepentant sin under a “rug of grace.” Jesus died for our sins because they were heinous enough to separate us from God. Our sins cost Jesus His life. How can we simply continue to live in them? But that’s what we do when we ignore the truth about what God calls sin.

Yes, Jesus is loving, but He is also just. Jesus is merciful, but He is also holy. We must not misrepresent Jesus to either the world or the Church.

It’s not grace or truth. It’s grace and truth. Both/and. Amen and amen.

 

Read More »

4 Reasons Christians Compromise with the Culture

Christians compromiseI am patiently waiting on the next grandson to arrive. Okay, let me be honest. I’m waiting. We can leave the “patiently” part out. In fact, by the time this post actually goes live, he may be here.

The world my grandson will know is very different than the world of my childhood. Or even the world my children grew up in. We live in a highly sexualized culture that permeates everything. Greed, selfishness, and self-indulgence run rampant.

It seems it gets harder every day for a Christ-follower to navigate the landmines of our society. Morals and values have shifted dramatically away from God’s standards. Almost every day another story in the news demonstrates this ongoing clash between the world’s values and God’s standards. (For more info see Ed Stetzer’s article on Christian responses to cultural change in Christianity Today.)

I’ve seen three possible ways Christians deal with the culture clash:

  • Separate from the world – Granted, it’s easier to live by God’s standards if we remove ourselves from the influence of the world. But there’s one big problem with that. In doing so, we also remove the influence of Christ from the world. Jesus calls us to go out into the world and take the Gospel (John 17:14-18), not hunker down in a holy bunker.
  • Live by God’s standards out in the world – This is the hardest road to walk. But God promised that through His divine power, He has given us everything we need for life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3). With discipline, intentionality, and constant dependence on the Holy Spirit, we can live lives that please God and honor the name of Christ.
  • Compromise in one or more areas – Although some believers do simply throw up their hands without even trying to live by God’s standards, the majority of us simply straddle the fence here and there. Sometimes we compromise. Sometimes we think God’s way is “too hard” or “too boring” or just “too weird” compared to the world.

4 Reasons Christians Compromise with the Culture:

So why do we do it? Why do followers of Christ sometimes follow the world? Here are four reasons based on time in God’s Word and a bit of observation:

  1. Indulge our own desires – This is probably the most frequent reason. We have sinful desires and sometimes we give in to them. Let’s remember – We never have to give in to temptation. God will always provide a way out if we will take it (1 Corinthians 10:13).
  2. Ignorance of God’s Word – Sometimes believers live like the world in one or more areas simply because they don’t know God’s standard. Yet God calls us to “not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance,” but to be holy in all we do (1 Peter 1:13-15). Thankfully we can learn since we have full access to His Word!
  3. Fear of being “labeled” – Sometimes believers worry more about what the world will think of us than what God will think of us. We don’t want to be considered a “bigot” or “self-righteous.” We don’t want to be different or stand out in a crowd. So we compromise to fit in.
  4. Misguided attempt to be relevant – I’ve heard and seen Christians – even Christian leaders – dress and speak in questionable ways in an attempt to connect with the culture. If our speech or dress or behavior shocks or offends even a handful of Christians in the room, we should reconsider. Jesus and His message of salvation are always relevant. We don’t have to compromise to share them.

Do you find it hard to live by God’s standards in this world? Is one of these four reasons a bigger struggle than the others? Why do you think that is?

Read More »

7 Things God Cannot Do

Yes, I know. God is all-powerful, all-knowing, sovereign, and holy. I fully embrace all that God’s Word says about who He is, how He works, and what He can do. But there are some things that God cannot – or will not – do precisely because of who He is.

These 7 things are not a comprehensive list, but they will all help us better understand our one, true God. I pray they also help you to worship Him more passionately and trust Him more completely.

7 Things God Cannot Do

  1. God cannot be wrong or make a mistake – Everything God does is right. His knowledge is perfect (Job 37:16). All His works are perfect (Deut 32:4). He never even makes an “honest mistake.”
  2. God cannot sin – God is holy. He is “light” and in Him there is no darkness (1 John 1:5). Perfect holiness. Not a speck of unholiness. God cannot do anything against His perfect, holy nature. He cannot do evil or be tempted by evil (James 1:13).
  3. God cannot lie – Yes, a lie is sin, so this one is covered by #2. However, since the Bible makes a point of telling us this specifically, I thought it was worth emphasizing! God doesn’t lie like we humans do. He only tells the truth, all the time, every time. (Hebrews 6:18, Titus 1:2, Numbers 23:19)
  4. God cannot change – Perfection cannot become more perfect. Since God has perfect knowledge and perfect character, He cannot change His mind or improve His behavior. (Malachi 3:6). By the way, we shouldn’t dare to “update” God’s Word or standards to match our times. Our culture may be changing constantly, but God “does not change like shifting shadows” (James 1:17).
  5. God cannot break a promise – We can always take God at His word. He is faithful to keep His covenants. What He says, He will do. (Psalm 89:34)
  6. God cannot get tired – No matter how much God accomplishes, how great and far-reaching His works, He will not grow weary or fatigued (Isaiah 40:28). In fact, He has strength in abundance and is willing to share His strength with us! (Isaiah 40:31)
  7. God cannot stop “being” – Our Creator God is the God who “IS.” His personal name, Yahweh, expresses the nature of His existence. He exists because He is. He exists outside of time. He has not ever “not existed” at any point, in any dimension. By nature of who He is, He must exist. Isn’t that mind blowing? (Exodus 3:13-15, Psalm 90:1-5, Revelation 1:1-8)

So, what do you think? Do you agree that there are some things God cannot do?

Read More »

5 Benefits of Living a Holy Life

5 Benefits Holiness“Holiness” is often misunderstood. Many believers think living a holy life is just too hard. Or too boring. Or simply undesirable. We recognize the truth that God commands His children to be holy as He is holy (1 Peter 1:16). We do want to please Him, but life gets in the way.

We fail to realize that the benefits of holiness far outweigh anything we might need to “sacrifice.” The gain is far greater than the loss of any worldly activity, behavior, or attitude.

In his book, The Pursuit of Holiness, Jerry Bridges defines holiness this way: “To be morally blameless. It is to be separated from sin and, therefore, consecrated to God. The word signifies ‘separation to God, and the conduct befitting those so separated.” The basic meaning of “holy” is to be “set apart.” We are set apart from the world, its sinful ways, and our own fleshly desires. We are set apart to God.

Maybe holiness sounds like an overwhelming, daunting, or impossible task? Humanly speaking it is. But, whatever God requires of His children, He also supplies. God requires holiness, but His Spirit provides the power to turn away from sin. God calls us to holiness and God provides what we need to be holy.

Usually what it comes down to is simply our desire to live a holy life. Why would we want to be holy? The following 5 benefits are not the only reasons to pursue holiness, but they’re one Scripture mentions repeatedly.

  1. Holiness fosters intimacy with God and builds spiritual strength and stability (Psalm 15:1-6).
  2. Holiness makes us useful and effective for God’s purposes (2 Timothy 2:20-26).
  3. Holiness causes people around you to glorify God (1 Peter 2:9-12).
  4. Holiness builds peace with God (2 Peter 3:10-18).
  5. Holiness pleases God and produces “fruit” (Ephesians 5:1-17).

And those 5 benefits are just the beginning of how God blesses a holy life!

How have you thought about holiness in the past? Have you thought a holy life was too hard? Simply undesirable? Would love to hear your thoughts!

Want to learn more about living a holy life? Check out Kathy’s Bible study “Embraced by Holiness.”

Read More »

All Creation Sings God’s Praise

Psalm 19Have you ever stopped to consider the size of the universe or the scope of creation? Earth, our home, and seven other planets revolve around a sun to form a single solar system. Yet, our sun is just one of more than 200 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy. That’s big! In fact, it would take us 100,000 years to cross our galaxy at the speed of light. And that’s just the beginning. Our galaxy is only one of billions of galaxies across the vast expanse of the cosmos. And our God made it all.

Let’s take an abrupt shift in our thinking and move from big to small, from inconceivably huge to microscopically tiny. About 100 trillion cells comprise the human body – including yours. Each cell is packed with DNA. This complex molecule stores information that determines your body’s unique physical characteristics, like the color of your eyes. If the DNA in just one cell were laid out flat in one long line, it would stretch more than 6 feet in length. 

The same God who tossed billions of galaxies across the universe also folded 6 feet of DNA into every cell of your body. He determined the size of the cosmos and counted the number of hairs on your head.

Creation summons us to know and worship the Creator. The psalmist David heard and responded.

The heavens declare the glory of God;
    the skies proclaim the work of his hands.
Day after day they pour forth speech;
    night after night they reveal knowledge.
They have no speech, they use no words;
    no sound is heard from them.
Yet their voice goes out into all the earth,
    their words to the ends of the world.
Psalm 19:1-4

Creation reveals the power and majesty of God. No language difference or cultural barrier can hinder its message. No government or law can silence its voice. The vast beauty of the heavens and the complex inner workings of the human body reflect the holiness of God to every person, of every language, in every place. Without exception.

Time to do a little declaring of our own. In the space below, write a prayer of praise and thanksgiving to the Creator.

 

Read More »